Finding you the quietest technology and solutions to unwanted noise

What is Quiet Mark?

Quiet Mark is the independent, international approval award programme associated with the UK Noise Abatement Society charitable foundation. It encourages companies worldwide to prioritise noise reduction within the design of everyday machines and appliances, and find solutions to noise problems to benefit health and well being.

Through scientific testing and assessment, Quiet Mark identifies the quietest products in a given category giving consumers more informed choice about the products they buy. The Quiet Mark scheme drives designers and manufacturers to reduce sound levels in their products enabling consumers to enjoy a less stressful domestic soundscape.

Why Quiet Mark?

"I couldn't hear my baby crying over the noise of the hairdryer"

The damaging effect of excessive noise on health, productivity and social cohesion is seriously underestimated.

World Health Organisation research shows that environmental noise pollution affects mental and physical health and is now second only to air pollution as the world’s largest killer pollutant.

In our fast-paced lives, vibrancy is exciting and necessary. But this heightened state can only be valued if there is also the opportunity to choose the alternatives of calm, quiet and the chance to switch off.

Quiet Mark helps consumers refine their aural environment as Soundscape becomes the new design priority to support a vital health balance.

Quiet Mark was established to provide a credible, independent scheme that would help consumers easily identify quieter products for the home, at work and in public spaces.



Kenwood kMix mixer

How we assess

Quiet Mark partners with a range of experts within the field of acoustic analysis, product testing and some of the most prominent minds in psychoacoustics.

Anderson Acoustics is at the forefront of developments in the field of acoustics and the affects of sound, affiliated with the Institute of Acoustics and the Association of Noise Consultants.

Quiet Mark is now established in North America and Canada enjoying a similar acoustic testing association with Good Housekeeping US as with its British counterpart.

To reflect a realistic end-user scenario, each product is acoustically tested and assessed where possible in the context of the real life environment. For example, Kettles, blenders or coffee machines are tested in a kitchen, whilst vacuum cleaners are assessed using a range of different floor surfaces. Products are compared like-for like in category and a selection of the quietest awarded Quiet Mark status.

As advancements in acoustic design are constantly being made, each product category is re-evaluated annually to continually raise the bar for acoustic design.

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To reflect a realistic end-user scenario, each product is acoustically tested and assessed where possible in the context of the real life environment. For example, Kettles, blenders or coffee machines are tested in a kitchen, whilst vacuum cleaners are assessed using a range of different floor surfaces. Products are compared like-for like in category and a selection of the quietest awarded Quiet Mark status.

As advancements in acoustic design are constantly being made, each product category is re-evaluated annually to continually raise the bar for acoustic design.

Our heritage

The Noise Abatement Society (NAS) was founded in 1959 by the entrepreneurial businessman John Connell OBE who believed that being exposed to excessive noise profoundly affected health, children's learning, productivity, and general quality of life – he called noise ‘the forgotten pollutant’.

John almost single-handedly lobbied the Noise Abatement Act through Parliament, when in 1960, noise became a statutory nuisance for the first time in the UK.

His practical problem-solving included introducing rubber dustbin lids and plastic milk crates to reduce urban disturbance, stopping night flights, and in the early 70’s he commissioned detailed planning for a revolutionary Thames Estuary Airport directing flight paths out to sea.

Today the internationally respected NAS seeks to accelerate change to protect future generations from a worsening aural environment by disseminating new methods of sound management, running an awareness programme for schools, incentivising industry to design low-noise technology and providing the only national help line dedicated solely to the problems of noise.

NAS cannot change the human condition, but it can offer practical ways to support those who wish to exercise choice in an otherwise noisy world.